4 Must-Dos to Help You Talk About Change

Posted by David Grossman on Wed, Feb 24, 2021

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Change of any kind in a company can bring uncertainty. And when things feel uncertain, it’s more important than ever to be proactive in communicating. Everyone will have lots of questions about the future, and it’s important not to ignore these questions or pretend no one’s asking them.

What’s the best way to talk about change? Here are four tips for addressing change successfully:

  1. Acknowledge the change

    If you don’t acknowledge when things may be changing, team members will fill the “information vacuum” with their own assumptions…or worse yet, delay work getting done. 
  2. Talk about what you do know

    Even when there’s uncertainty, there’s much you often know and can talk about in the business. Stay focused on what’s certain; for instance, the constant need to anticipate what customers need. In most cases, there’s more you know that will be valuable to employees than you might think.
  3. Address questions as candidly as possible

    Commit to straightforward answers about things you know for certain. When you don’t yet have an answer—don’t be afraid to say “I don’t know… but I’ll see what I can find out.” If you don’t acknowledge when things are changing—team members will fill the “information vacuum” with their own assumptions.
  4. Share concerns with other leaders and communicators

    Don’t keep the tough questions you’ve tackled to yourself. Make sure you let leaders—and your communications team—know what topics come up in your area of the company.

How you answer employee questions will determine their level of trust in you, and consequently, their willingness to follow you.

Which must-do do you need to work on regarding change?

—David Grossman


Get a 3-step formula and template to define the change, your audience, the role they play and a 4-part method to mapping your message. Click the image below to download your free copy today.

Communicate in Times of Change Tool - The Grossman Group

Tags: Communicating Change